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A serious Apple iOS bug has been discovered that allows FaceTime users to access the microphone and front facing camera of who they are calling even if the person does not answer the call.

To use this bug, a caller would FaceTime another person who has an iOS device and before the recipient answers, add themselves as an additional contact to Group FaceTime. This will cause the microphone of the person you are calling to turn on and allow the caller to listen to what is happening in the room. Even worse, if the person that is being called presses the power button to mute the FaceTime call, the front facing caSecuritymera would turn on as well.

What this means, is if someone is calling you on FaceTime, they could be listening and seeing what you are doing without you even knowing.

BleepingComputer has tested and confirmed that this bug works in iOS 12.1.2 and we were able to hear and see the person. When testing it against an Apple Watch, though, we were not able to get the audio portion of the bug to work.

While it is not known who first discovered this bug, numerous people have been posting about it on social media and making video demonstrations as shown below.

Embedded video

Benji Mobb™@BmManskiNow you can answer for yourself on FaceTime even if they don’t answer  explain this..

When 9to5Mac first reported on the bug, they were only able to get the microphone snooping working. Later, BuzzFeed reported that they could also access the front facing camera and that Apple stated that they are “aware of this issue and we have identified a fix that will be released in a software update later this week.

Natalie Silvanovich, a Google Project Zero security researcher who has discovered numerous FaceTime issues in the past, has a theory as to how this could be happening.

Natalie Silvanovich@natashenka

Theory: FaceTime stores call participants in a list that doesn’t allow duplicates, and uses the indexes for signalling. When the caller is added a second time, the entry at index 1 is set to answered, with the expectation that it is the caller …https://9to5mac.com/2019/01/28/facetime-bug-hear-audio/ 

For those who are rightfully concerned about this bug, my suggestion is that you disable FaceTime immediately until Apple releases a patch. Otherwise, people can not only listen in on what you are doing, but in some cases also see what you are doing. This could allow people to take compromising videos and audio without your knowledge.

To disable FaceTime you can follow these steps:

  1. Go into Settings
  2. Tap FaceTime
  3. Now toggle the FaceTime switch so that it is disabled and your screens looks like the following.FaceTime Disabled

Now that FaceTime is disabled, callers will be unable to utilize this bug to listen and watch you without your permission through FaceTime.

Source: Bleeping Computer

An emergency directive from the Department of Homeland Security provides “required actions” for U.S. government agencies to prevent widespread DNS hijacking attacks.

The Department of Homeland Security is ordering all federal agencies to urgently audit Domain Name System (DNS) security for their domains in the next 10 business days.

The department’s rare “emergency directive,” issued Tuesday, warned that multiple government domains have been targeted by DNS hijacking attacks, allowing attackers to redirect and intercept web and mail traffic.

“[The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency] (CISA) is aware of multiple executive branch agency domains that were impacted by the tampering campaign and has notified the agencies that maintain them,” said the alert.

The warning comes on the heels of a Jan. 10 FireEye report which detailed a wave of DNS hijacking attacks targeting victims in North America, Europe, Middle East and North Africa.

DNS hijacking is a type of malicious attack in which an individual redirects queries to a domain name server via overriding a computer’s transmission control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP) settings – generally by modifying a server’s settings.

The DHS, for its part, said that the attacker begins by logging into the DNS provider’s administration panel using previously-compromised credentials.

The attacker then alters DNS records – including the address mail exchanger or name server records – and replaces the legitimate address of a service with their own address controls, thus redirecting traffic. Attackers can also alter and tamper with the traffic flows.

dns hijacking attack Iran

Credit: PureVPN

“This enables them to direct user traffic to their own infrastructure for manipulation or inspection before passing it on to the legitimate service, should they choose,” said the DHS in its advisory. “This creates a risk that persists beyond the period of traffic redirection.”

Since the attackers can set record values for the domain name systems, they can obtain valid encryption certificates for an organization’s domain names; this allows browsers to establish a connection without any certificate errors as the certificate can be trusted, FireEye researchers said. In the most recent campaigns, the attackers have used certificates from the Let’s Encrypt open certificate authority.

That valid certificate then enables the redirected traffic to be decrypted and exposes any user-submitted data.

The emergency directive issued by the DHS provides “required actions” that government agencies must fulfill in the next 10 business days.

“To address the significant and imminent risks to agency information and information systems presented by this activity, this emergency directive requires… near-term actions to mitigate risks from undiscovered tampering, enable agencies to prevent illegitimate DNS activity for their domains and detect unauthorized certificates,” said the report.

First, the DHS said all .gov domain admins must audit their DNS records over the next 10 days to verify if any traffic is being redirected.

The department also urged agencies to update their passwords for all accounts on systems that can make changes to agency DNS records, and to implement multi-factor authentication for accounts on DNS admin systems. Finally, agencies are being directed to monitor certificate transparency logs.

The warning comes as the U.S. government enters its 33rd day of a shutdown (as of Wednesday), a longstanding incident which has sparked concerns about its impact across the board when it comes to security.

Researchers assess “with moderate confidence” that the recent DNS hijacking activity is conducted by a group or groups in Iran, and that the activity aligns with Iranian government interests.

The attacks have been observed in clusters between January 2017 to January 2019, the researchers said in an analysis of the attacks.

Alister Shepherd, MEA director of Mandiant at FireEye, told Threatpost that the campaign is ongoing – but that there is no indication of how many credentials have been harvested thus far. However, researcher do state that the attackers had “a high degree of success” harvesting targets’ credentials.

This most recent DNS hijacking campaign “showcases the continuing evolution in tactics from Iran-based actors,” FireEye researchers stressed. “This is an overview of one set of TTPs that we recently observed affecting multiple entities.”

Source: Threatpost

An Introduction to CompTIA and Cisco

When looking to break into the field of networking or aspiring to obtain a networking certification, the two most popular entry-level certifications are Cisco CCENT and CompTIA Network+.

What is CISCO?

CISCO is a company based in San Jose, California in the USA involved in the manufacturing, designing, and selling of Network Equipment. It has grown from its inception in 1984 to become the most significant networking company in existence. CISCO was added to the NASDAQ stock exchange in 1990 after going public, and in by the year, 2000 became the world’s most marketable company, showing a market capitalization of over $500 billion.

Cisco Logo
Cisco Logo

The certifications attainable from CISCO include:

• CCENT
• CCT
• CCNA Routing and Switching
• CCDA
• CCNA Cloud
• CCNA Collaboration
• CCNA Data Center
• CCNA Security
• CCNA Service Provider
• CCNP Routing and Switching
• CCDP
• CCNP Collaboration
• CCNP Data Center
• CCNP Security
• CCNP Service Provider
• CCNP Wireless
• CCIE Routing and Switching
• CCDE
• CCIE Collaboration
• CCIE Data Center
• CCIE Security
• CCIE Service Provider
• CCIE Wireless
• CCIE Routing and Switching
• CCDE
• CCIE Collaboration
• CCIE Data Center
• CCIE Security
• CCIE Service Provider
• CCIE Wireless

What is CompTIA?

CompTIA (Computing Technology Industry Association) is a non-profit trade association that was formed in 1982. The organization is vendor-neutral and provides certifications in the IT industry. It was at first known as the Association of Better Computer Dealers, but the name was later changed to better imply the company’s ever-changing role in the computer industry.

CompTIA certification
CompTIA Logo

The organization’s increase saw them eventually include subjects such as networking, imaging, mobile computing, UNIX. In 2010, CompTIA launched the “Creating IT Futures” ambition which sees them offering IT training to individuals with a lower income and veterans returning from their military duties.

Their certifications currently available from CompTIA include:

• A+
• Network+
• Security+
• CASP
• Server+
• CTT+
• Linux+
• Project+
• Cloud+

Understanding Cisco CCENT

CISCO CCENT is the first of two exams that can be passed for the student to earn their CCNA (Cisco Certified Networking Associate) certification. The review relating to CISCO CCENT is called ICND1 (Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 1).

This exam will consist of the following topics:

Explain the operation of data networks:
The student will be required to identify the functions of different network devices and to select the correct components to meet the network’s specifications. Use the protocols of TCP/IP to explain the flow of network data, explain what common web applications and networking applications are.

Implement a small switched network:
Use the correct equipment to network devices, interconnect switches, network devices, and hosts and describe media access control and technology for Ethernet types. Describe what network segmentation is, describe the operation of CISCO switches and their necessary operation, perform initial switch operations and save, and verify them. Work through hardware failures on switched networks.

Implement an IP addressing scheme and IP services to meet network requirements for a small branch office:
Create and execute an addressing scheme to a network, assign and verify IP addresses for hosts, networking devices and servers on a Local Area Network. Describe what DNS operations are and validate them, configure, test and troubleshoot DHCP and DNS on a router and identify and remedy IP address problems.

Implement a small routed network:
Describe what the basic concepts of routing are, explain the basic operation of CISCO routers, interconnect routers with networking devices using the correct equipment, connect, configure, and verify device interface operational status. Verify the device configuration using commands and utilities and ascertain the state of the network and router operation.

Explain and select the appropriate administrative tasks required for a Wireless LAN (WLAN):
Define the standards of wireless media, describe the various components of a small wireless network, specify the parameters and configuration needed for devices to connect to the right areas on a wireless network and identify common issues with wireless networks.

Identify security threats to a network and describe general methods to mitigate those threats:
Describe common network security threats and how the correct security policy helps defend against them. Describe what the best security practices to follow in securing network devices.

Implement and verify WAN links:
Describe what the different methods are to connect to a Wide Area Network, configure an essential WAN serial connection and check that network.

Understanding CompTIA Network+

CompTIA Network+ has a much broader view of networking than CISCO does, but takes a lighter approach in their topics. The topics that are included in the CompTIA Network+ course include the following:

Network Technologies:
services including TCP/IP suite, Networking protocols default TCP, and UDP port numbers, addressing formats for IPv4, IPv6, and MAC addressing, discussing addressing technologies (subnetting, CIDR, supernetting, NAT, and PAT), a discussion on routing, and a reviewing wireless communication standards, authentication, and encryption.

Network Media and Topologies:
Standard cable types and their properties including transmission speeds, distances, duplexing, noise immunity, and frequencies; cable connector types and common physical network topologies (star, mesh, bus, ring). Various wiring standards, LAN and WAN technology types, and properties plus wiring distribution systems and components.

Network Devices:
Includes the range of networking equipment like hubs, network interfaces, modems and media converters, switches, wireless access points, routers, firewalls, etc. Functions of specialized networking devices. There is a broader focus on switch details such as virtual LANs and port mirroring.

Network Management:
An explanation of management at the seven layers of the OSI model, configuration management and it’s documentation, describing how to use literature to verify a network. Monitoring network performance and connectivity, methods for optimizing a system, methods of network troubleshooting and common problem-solving issues.

Network Tools:
Different types of software and diagnostic tools used to identify and troubleshoot networking issues. Essential command-line IP tools, different network scanners. Discovering different types of diagnostic hardware such as cable testers, protocol analyzers and TDRs, electrical tools like VOMs, temperature monitors, and various other devices.

Network Security:
An overview of security device functions and features then digs into firewall features and functions, Methods of network access security and user authentication. Device security problems including physical access and logical, secure vs. insecure network access methods and common security threats and security justification techniques.

Cisco CCENT vs. CompTIA Network+

The choice between CISCO CCENT and CompTIA N+ relies on how sincerely you want to delve into the world of networking. CompTIA N+ has a much broader, yet less involved scope towards the subject while CISCO takes a more in-depth approach to networking while having a smaller extent as far as topics covered is concerned.

Both the CISCO CCENT and CompTIA certifications have recognised the world over as good entry level certifications and, whichever of the two you end up choosing, it is sure to set you well on your way to a career in networking or to add that much sought-after certification to your name.

Source: Medium

IT certifications can open many doors throughout your career, especially when you’re searching for your next challenge. Recruiters and hiring managers tend to look at the Certifications section of a tech resume before anything else. Why? They want candidates with up-to-date knowledge, and IT certifications quickly show them a person’s mastery of a particular technology or practice.

These are some of the most valuable IT certifications today, according to the 2019 Robert Half Technology Salary Guide:

  • Certified Scrum Master (CSM)
  • AWS Certified Solutions Architect
  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)
  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP)
  • CompTIA A+
  • Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC)
  • ITIL
  • Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure
  • Project Management Professional (PMP)

Certifications 2019

You can earn an IT certification in a wide range of practices, from help desk basics to mastery of complex cloud environments. So whether you’re a recent graduate or seasoned tech specialist, preparing for and attaining a certification is a great way to expand your skill set, impress prospective employers and stand out from the crowd. Here’s a roundup of some of the most valuable IT certifications today.

Best entry-level and intermediate IT certifications

Just starting out in the IT field? Or perhaps you’re ready to specialize? The following are some of the best introductory and mid-level certifications today:

CompTIA certifications

CompTIA issues certifications for a variety of technologies and platforms, but one stands above the rest in terms of value to IT pros:

  • CompTIA A+: Get started in IT with this foundational certificate. It’s all about hardware, technical support and troubleshooting. It also covers best practices in security, networking, operational procedures, mobile devices and various operating systems.

Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) certifications

The most valuable certifications from this tech giant include:

  • Microsoft Office Specialist: The MOS, MOS Expert and MOS Master certifications show your competence level in Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, Access, SharePoint, OneNote and Exchange. They’re not just for administrative professionals — these certifications are also helpful for IT workers in cloud computing and general tech support.
  • Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert: MCSE certifications come in several specializations and show that you have the skills to manage servers, data systems, storage, private clouds, networking and more, depending on which ones you successfully complete.
  • Microsoft Certified Solution Developer: Getting the MCSD certification shows that you have what it takes to design and create apps across a wide range of Windows products.

Cisco certifications

As Cisco is a leading provider of infrastructure products, a certificate from this company confirms that the holder is prepared for the latest developments and best practices in networking. The most essential are:

  • Cisco Certified Network Associate: A step up from Cisco’s entry-level certification, CCNAs can specialize in one of the following areas: cloud, collaboration, cyber operations, data center, industrial/IoT, routing and switching, security, service provider, and wireless.
  • Cisco Certified Network Professional: A step up from the associate level, the CCNP is a more advanced IT certificate in one of the above specialty areas.

Best IT certifications for security

Hacking and cyber attacks are hot topics today, and many jobs in security and risk management are going unfilled. The following are some of the most valuable IT certifications in this booming field.

ISACA certifications

A professional organization devoted to IT security and governance, ISACA manages five global certification programs, including:

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor: According to the ISACA, the CISA is its cornerstone certification. As the name indicates, this exam is aimed at information systems (IS) professionals who monitor, control and assess a company’s IT or business systems. This certificate requires five years of professional experience in the field.
  • Certified Information Security Manager: The leading credential for information security managers, the CISM certification is designed for people who design, build and manage information security programs. To qualify, you must have at least five years of IS experience and three years as a security manager.
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control: The CRISC (pronounced SEE-risk) accredits professionals and project managers responsible for information security and its overall impact on the enterprise. It covers risk identification, risk assessment, risk response and mitigation, and risk control monitoring and reporting.
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT: The CGEIT demonstrates your understanding of enterprise IT governance principles and practices. It is one of the most sought-after certifications in IT, commanding some of the highest salaries.
  • Cybersecurity Nexus: In a time of constantly evolving cybersecurity threats, the CSX certification demonstrates that you are up-to-date on the most current security standards and risks.

Other valuable IT certifications for security include:

  • Certified Ethical Hacker: EC-Council offers several certification programs, and one of the most popular ones is the CEH. Holders of this specialize in penetration testing, which is why this IT certificate is often a prerequisite for positions like cyber forensics analyst, cybersecurity engineer and applications developer.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional: This is one of the most sought-after certifications in cybersecurity. Designed for experienced IT professionals, CISSP holders understand vulnerabilities in networked systems and create policies to safeguard systems and minimize risk.
  • Global Information Assurance Certifications: All about information security, the GIACs come in several categories: cyber defense; penetration testing; incident response and forensics; cybersecurity management, audit and legal proficiencies; developer; and industrial control systems. The highest level is the GIAC Security Expert (GSE).

Certification baseline

Best certifications for cloud computing

As cloud computing becomes the new normal in IT, more cloud credentials are available. Many of them are specific to individual vendors, including Microsoft, VMware and Amazon. There are also a few certifications that focus on more general practices across this fast-growing area. Top certifications include:

Best management certifications

Project management is indispensable to IT operations. Even if you’re tech-focused, it can be a very valuable soft skill to acquire. And because project management involves planning, scheduling, budgeting and execution, certification can be a key steppingstone to managerial positions.

  • Certified Associate in Project Management: Offered by the highly respected Project Management Institute (PMI), the CAPM is an ideal entry-level credential.
  • Project Management Professional: Also offered by PMI, the PMP credential is among the most prestigious in the profession. A number of subspecialty certifications are also available.
  • Certified Scrum Master: The entry-level CSM certification is offered by the Scrum Alliance. It is an excellent way to show your knowledge of Scrum and Agile management practices.

Best help desk certifications

Many IT professionals begin their careers in technical support and help desk roles. And to give students a leg up, schools are increasingly offering courses that specifically prepare students to gain help desk certifications.

You can gain certification in either help desk functions as a whole, or you can concentrate on a specific vendor’s platforms and products.

  • HDI certifications: Formerly called the Help Desk Institute, HDI offers certifications that range from the entry-level HDI Desktop Support Technician to the HDI Support Center Director. The HDI Technical Support Professional certification is particularly popular with hiring managers. They also offer credentials for support center analysts, team leaders and customer service representatives.
  • ITIL: The UK organization AXELOS is charged with promoting best practices for IT service management (ITSM). ITIL, formerly an acronym for Information Technology Infrastructure Library, is the registered name for a widely accepted framework for managing IT service delivery. There are five ITIL certifications, ranging from Foundation to Master.
  • Apple Certified Support Professional: You can demonstrate your expertise with macOS with this the ACSP certification from Apple.

Best certifications in database, analytics and other data technologies

Database technologies remain foundational to IT operations, while growth in big data and analytics initiatives is driving new career opportunities. Certifications tend to be built around a single provider’s platform, including:

  • Oracle Certified Professional: Oracle, the world’s leading database provider, offers certification in a range of database professions, from database administration and database application development to analytics, data warehousing and big data.
  • SAP Certified Technology Associate – SAP HANA 2.0: This certification demonstrates your ability to install, manage, monitor, migrate and troubleshoot SAP’s database technology.
  • Microsoft SQL Server certifications: Like Oracle, Microsoft offers a range of certifications, including database administration, business intelligence, and data management and analytics.
  • CCIE Data Center: This Cisco certification demonstrates expert-level skills required to plan, prepare, operate, monitor and troubleshoot complex data center networks.

According to the Robert Half Technology Salary Guide, employers prefer to hire certified professionals, especially those who also have college degrees and real-world experience to go along with them. Those who put in the effort to obtain credentials can expect larger salaries and quicker movement up the career ladder, not to mention a healthy shot of self-confidence.

Source: Robert Half

What just happened?

Yesterday, it emerged that more than a billion unique email address and password combinations had been posted to a hacking forum for anyone to see in a mega-breach dubbed Collection #1.

The breach was revealed by security researcher Troy Hunt, who runs the service allowing users to see if they’ve been hacked called Have I been Pwned. He has now loaded the unique email addresses totalling 772,904,991 onto the site.

The data includes more than a billion unique email and password combinations – which hackers can use over a range of sites to compromise your services. They will do so by utilizing so-called credential stuffing attacks, seeing bots automatically testing millions of email and password combinations on a whole range of website login pages.

The data originally appeared briefly on cloud service MEGA and was later posted to a popular hacking forum. The Collection #1 folder is comprised of more than 12,000 files weighing in at 87 gigabytes.

Most concerningly, the protective hashing of the stolen passwords had been cracked. This means they are easy to use because they are available in plain text rather than being cryptographically hashed as they often are when sites are breached.

Should I be worried?

In a word: Yes. It’s a massive concern, not least because scale of this breach is huge: Yahoo’s breaches saw 1 billion and 3 billion users affected but the stolen data hasn’t actually resurfaced yet.

And unlike other huge hacks such as Yahoo and Equifax, this breach cannot be tied down to one site. Instead it appears to comprise multiple breaches across a number of services including 2,000 databases.

Hunt says there are many legitimate breaches in the directory listing, but he cannot yet verify this further. “This number makes it the single largest breach ever to be loaded into HIBP,” he adds in a blog.

What’s more, his own personal data is in there “and it’s accurate”, he says. “Right email address and a password I used many years ago. Like many of you reading this, I’ve been in multiple data breaches before which have resulted in my email addresses and yes, my passwords, circulating in public.”

Finding out if you’re affected

If you are one of the 2.2 million people that already use the Have I Been Pwned site, you should have received a notification: Nearly half of the site’s users – or 768,000 – are caught up in this breach.

If you aren’t already a member, you need to visit Have I Been Pwned now. Once on the site, you simply need to type in your email address and search, then scroll down to the bottom of the page. The site will let you know if your email address is affected by this breach – and while you are there, you can see if your details were stolen in any others too.

To find out if your password has been compromised, you separately need to check Pwned Passwords– a feature built into the site recently. This feature also helps you to use strong passwords: if yours is on there, it’s safe to assume others are using it and your accounts could be easily breached.

What if my details are there?

Hunt says in his blog: “Whilst I can’t tell you precisely what password was against your own record in the breach, I can tell you if any password you’re interested in has appeared in previous breaches Pwned Passwords has indexed. If one of yours shows up there, you really want to stop using it on any service you care about.”

If you have a bunch of passwords, checking all of them could be time-consuming. In this case, Hunt suggests 1Password’s Watchtower feature which can take all your stored passwords and check them against Pwned Passwords in one go.

Most importantly, if your password is on the list, do not ignore it as it can be used in credential stuffing attacks mentioned earlier. Hunt says: “People take lists like these that contain our email addresses and passwords then they attempt to see where else they work. The success of this approach is predicated on the fact that people reuse the same credentials on multiple services.”

More generally, as the number of breaches and their sheer scale increases, it’s time to clean up your password practices. In addition to using two-factor authentication, passwords should be complex – such as a phrase from a favourite book or a line from a song. At the same time, security experts don’t rule out analogue books containing your password – as long as these are not stored on your device or with it.

If you take these measures into account you should be able to avoid using the same password across multiple sites. Ideally, start using a password manager to ensure you can remember these.

Source: Forbes

Lukas Stefanko, an IT security researcher at ESET has discovered 9 Android apps on Google Play Store spamming users with unwanted ads. One of the apps called “Remote control for TV and home electronics” has been installed by more than 5 million users while in total all 9 apps have been installed by 8 million users around the world. This is the second time in one week that adware apps have been found on Google Play Store.

According to Stefanko, none of the apps actually work and their sole purpose is to bombard users with ads to generate revenue for app developers. It is noteworthy that these apps have been developed by Tools4TV, an Android developer that has been active since 2015.

Embedded video

 

9 fake apps containing functionality found on Google Play with over 8 Million installs.

Unwanted code is hidden in “not working” apps that once launched, hide itself from user’s view and display ads.
All these apps are fake without any promised functionality.

In his tweet dated 

The unwanted code is hidden in “not working” apps that once launched, hide itself from user’s view and display ads. All these apps are fake without any promised functionality,

The current list of well known malicious apps on Google play store is as follow:

– Remote control
– TV remote controller
– TV remote controlling
– Remote for Air conditioner
– Remote for television for free
– Air conditioner remote control
– Universal TV remote controller
– Remote control for the car (prank)
– Remote control for TV and home electronics

This is the second time in a week that researchers have reported the presence of adware apps on the Play Store. Last week, the IT security researchers at Trend Micro revealed that there were 85 adware infected apps on the marketplace bombarding around 9 million Android users with full-screen unwanted ads.

All 85 apps (developed by two different Android developers “Alger games and Kodev”) were then removed by Google however it is unclear whether there is a connection between apps reported by Trend Micro and Lukas Stefanko. 

At the time of publishing this article, Google has booted out Tools4TV along with their apps from the Play Store. To protect yourself from malware and adware apps avoid installing unnecessary apps from Google Play Store or from a third-party marketplace.

We suggest sticking to trusted developers and brands and only download an app after going through its review section. Moreover, installing a reliable antivirus would also be helpful in thwarting impending attacks. Here is a list of 10 powerful antiviruses for Android, iPhone, Mac, and PC

Source: Hack Read

A new reminder for those who are still holding on to the Windows 7 operating system—you have one year left until Microsoft ends support for its 9-year-old operating system.
So it’s time for you to upgrade your OS and say goodbye to Windows 7, as its five years of extended support will end on January 14, 2020—that’s precisely one year from today.
After that date, the tech giant will no longer release free security updates, bug fixes and new functionalities for the operating system that’s still widely used by people, which could eventually leave a significant number of users more susceptible to malware attacks.

However, the end of  free support doesn’t end Windows 7 support for big business and enterprise customers. As always, Microsoft does make exceptions for certain companies that are willing to pay a lot of money to continue their support.

According to a ‘Death of Windows 7’ report from content delivery firm Kollective, as many as 43% of enterprises are still running the nine-year-old operating system, of which 17% didn’t know when Microsoft’s end of support deadline hit.

Millions of Users Are Still Using Windows 7

Want to know how popular Windows 7 is among users? Even after aggressively pushing Windows 10 installations since its release in 2015, its market share finally managed to overtake the user-favorite Windows 7 just by the end of last year.

Windows 7 was released in 2009 and, according to December 2018 stats from Netmarketshare, is currently running on about 37 percent of the world’s PC fleet, which is far ahead of its radically redesigned successor Windows 8 and 8.1 combined.

Microsoft stopped the mainstream support for Windows 7 in January 2015, but Windows users have continued to receive security updates and patches for known security issues as part of the company’s extended support, which runs for at least five years.

In March 2017, Microsoft also started blocking new security patches and updates for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users running the latest processors from Intel, AMD, Qualcomm, and others.

“For Windows 7 to run on any modern silicon, device drivers and firmware need to emulate Windows 7’s expectations for interrupt processing, bus support, and power states- which is challenging for WiFi, graphics, security, and more,” the company said.

“The lifecycle begins when a product is released and ends when it’s no longer supported. Knowing key dates in this lifecycle helps you make informed decisions about when to update, upgrade or make other changes to your software.”

Besides ending support for Windows 7 next year, Microsoft will also end support for MS Office 2010, Windows Server 2008/2008 R2, SQL Server 2008/2008 R2, Exchange 2010 and Windows Embedded 7 in 2020.

As for Windows 8, the operating system’s extended support is set to end on January 10, 2023.

What Should Affected Windows 7 Users Do?

If you and/or your business are still running Windows 7, you still have one year left to shift to the latest operating system.

Government agencies and big enterprises can still pay for expensive extended support to continue receiving security updates and patches from the company if they need more than a year to migrate to the newer version.

However, regular users should upgrade their operating system immediately to Windows 10 or a Linux distribution, rather than running an unpatched and increasingly vulnerable version of Windows operating system.

A British hacker whose cyberattacks took the nation of Liberia offline has been jailed for almost three years.

Daniel Kaye launched a series of attacks on Liberian cell phone operator Lonestar in October 2015, which became so powerful they knocked out the west African country’s internet the following year.
Kaye, 30, had been hired to carry out the attacks by a senior employee at rival operator Cellcom, Britain’s National Crime Agency said in a statement, although there is no suggestion that Cellcom was aware of the activity.
He pleaded guilty to creating and using a botnet, a series of computers connected in order to attack systems, and possessing criminal property last month. Kaye was sentenced on Friday at Blackfriars Crown Court in central London to two years and eight months in prison.
While living in Cyprus, Kaye used a botnet he had created to trigger repeated distributed denial of service (DDoS) requests on Lonestar, causing the company to spend around $600,000 in remedial action.
The additional impact of customers leaving the network caused the company to lose tens of millions of dollars in lost revenue, the NCA added.
Following his arrest in February 2017, Kaye was extradited to Germany, where he also admitted to attacks on Deutsche Telekom that affected around 1 million customers in November 2016.
“Daniel Kaye was operating as a highly skilled and capable hacker-for-hire,” Mike Hulett, Head of Operations at the NCA’s National Cyber Crime Unit, said.
“His activities inflicted substantial damage on numerous businesses in countries around the world, demonstrating the borderless nature of cyber crime,” he added. “The victims in this instance suffered losses of tens of millions of dollars and had to spend a large amount on mitigating action.”
Source: CNN