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Just as 4G networks led to the ubiquity of the smartphone and other smart devices, 5G networks will lead to the rise of billions of new devices connected to the Internet, all talking with one another at incredibly fast speeds with remarkably low latency. This will open up vast new possibilities for consumers, businesses and society as a whole – everything from self-driving cars on the road to the ability for doctors to conduct remote surgery from anyplace in the world.

Verizon 5G keynote at CES

At the 2019 CES in Las Vegas, for example, Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg laid out a compelling vision for 5G, noting that it would help to bring about “the Fourth Industrial Revolution.” There are many technologies today powering this Fourth Industrial Revolution – everything from artificial intelligence and robotics to the Internet of Things (IoT) and virtual reality – and all of them are being given a push forward by 5G. AI, for example, is making it possible to create self-driving cars, while the IoT is making it possible for smart devices to become ubiquitous, both in the home and within the enterprise.

To highlight the various ways that Verizon is already starting to make this 5G future a reality, Vestberg invited a number of key technology partners on stage with himself, including top executives from the New York Times, Walt Disney Studios, and drone company Skyward to showcase some of their best 5G projects. The New York Times, for example, is the middle of creating a new 5G journalism lab to support data-intensive technologies such as VR and AR, while Skyward is making it possible to control as many as one million drones from anywhere in the world. (And, indeed, during his CES keynote, Vestberg piloted a drone based in Los Angeles while on stage in Las Vegas)

Cybersecurity concerns in the 5G world

And, yet, this exciting new 5G world will encounter its own share of cybersecurity challenges. Hackers and cybercriminals in the world will still look for ways to access user data and profit from it. With billions of devices connected to the Internet, they will have an incredibly large attack surface in which it will be much easier to find the proverbial “weakest link” in the security chain. Geoffrey R. Morgan, Founding Partner at Fairchild Morgan Law, suggests that, “The exponential increase in speed, density and efficiency afforded by 5G technology will cause a dramatic rise in cybersecurity concerns, particularly by those industries that are among the first to utilize it.”

Moreover, the ability of hackers to cause harm and destruction will also mount exponentially. In today’s 4G world, a huge botnet formed by hacking into user devices in the home could be used to mount large-scale DDOS attacks on websites; in tomorrow’s 5G world, that same botnet could be used to take out an entire network of self-driving cars in a single city, leading to mayhem on the roads.

Obviously, then, cybersecurity is just as much a concern in the 5G world as it is in the 4G world – and perhaps more so. Vast amounts of remote sensors and smart devices hooked up to global supply chains, for example, will radically increase the complexity of securing corporate networks from intruders and cyber criminals. And the sheer amount of data being created by 5G networks will make it much more difficult to spot anomalies in user behavior resulting from hackers. According to one estimate, for example, the data output of a single autonomous vehicle in one day will equal the daily output of 3,000 people.

The 8 currencies of 5G

The good news is that 5G is still so new that there is time to make security a priority. That, says Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, is one reason why the company has come up with the idea of 8 “currencies” for 5G. These currencies – peak data rate, mobile data volume, mobility, connected devices, energy efficiency, service deployment, reliability and latency – all represent key features of the Verizon 5G network that make it completely unlike anything we’ve seen before. For example, “peak data rate” refers to the ability to generate speeds of up to 10 Gbps, while “mobility” refers to the ability to stay connected while moving at speeds of up to 500 km/hour.

In the 3G and 4G world, the way that companies thought about their networks was in terms of two simple currencies: speed and throughput. In other words, how fast can you make uploads and downloads, and how much volume can your network handle at any point in time? But in a 5G world, companies need to expand their thinking from two currencies to eight currencies. Doctors and healthcare professionals, for example, place a tremendous value on “latency”: when they are doing remote surgeries, it is absolutely critical that end-to-end latency is as close to zero as possible. And, given the challenges posed by climate change, enterprises are much more aware of the value of the “energy efficiency” currency when it comes to 5G networks.

Using the 8 currencies of 5G to power future cybersecurity innovations

By taking this big picture view, it is possible to consider how the 8 currencies of 5G will have a positive impact on how we address cybersecurity issues in the future. Since 5G is not simply a faster version of 4G, but rather, an entirely new network architecture, it opens the door to entirely new security models for user privacy, identity management, and threat detection. For example, Hed Kovetz, CEO & Co-founder at Silverfort, notes that, “The 5G system incorporates secure identity management for identifying and authenticating users to ensure that only the genuine user can access services. Its new authentication framework enables mobile operators to choose authentication credentials, identifier formats and authentication methods for users and IoT devices.”

Moreover, the “mobility” currency, or the ability to stay connected while traveling at very fast speeds, means that it might be possible to create virtual security environments that travel with us as we move from point to point, regardless of which device we use, through the use of virtualization and cloud technologies. In fact, Robert Arandjelovic, Director of Product Marketing (Americas) at Symantec, suggests that, “A transition to 5G could lead to the complete obsolescence of the network perimeter. With the growth in cloud services and applications, the erosion of that perimeter has already begun… In a hyper-connected, non-perimeter world, the cloud and the endpoint become the new place where security technologies can be deployed to keep people safe.”

The “mobile data volume” currency means that emerging technologies that rely on vast amounts of data – such as machine learning and artificial intelligence – can now be deployed to create new AI-powered cybersecurity solutions. One idea that is gaining traction, for example, is using AI to spot anomalies in user and system behavior. This acts as a form of automated threat detection and mitigation, and helps to reduce the current dependence of 4G networks on user names and passwords as a way to keep users safe.

In many ways, AI cybersecurity solutions would benefit greatly from 5G. Aaron Bugal, Global Solutions Engineer at Sophos, notes that, “5G connectivity could help the way in which information integral to making a security decision is transported to the automated processes and people who need it. An example of this would be the ongoing benefit to artificial intelligence platforms that will only work best when they have as much information as possible to digest and learn from. Especially when they’re tasked with identifying unusual behavior across an organization, most of these platforms feed off data local to them, with devices that are remote or mobile unable to properly feed (upload) to these systems and typically exposing a short fall in awareness. 5G could unlock more data to get to an AI security platform in a shorter time and allow for best understanding of the organization and faster and accurate prediction of a security event.”

Cybersecurity and Verizon’s “Built on 5G” challenge

To help innovators come up with new 5G cybersecurity solutions, Verizon has launched a “Built on 5G Challenge” that offers a $1 million prize for a truly unique idea that builds on top of the 8 currencies of 5G. The “Built on 5G Challenge” will begin accepting submissions in April, with the winning team announced during Mobile World Congress Americas in October. For security researchers around the world, this could become a unique opportunity to make cybersecurity an enabling technology, rather than simply a “tax” on innovation. If the New York Times and Walt Disney Studios are creating their own showcase 5G labs, why can’t cybersecurity researchers also create their own 5G labs and launch innovative new products that use 5G?

Clearly, there is enormous potential for 5G to change how we address cybersecurity issues in the future. Many of the best technologies today – especially artificial intelligence – can be fully leveraged on these super-fast, low-latency 5G networks. As Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg noted at CES, “5G will change everything.” And that, of course, includes cybersecurity.

Thank you to Verizon Wireless for sponsoring this post

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Source: CPO Magazine

A British hacker whose cyberattacks took the nation of Liberia offline has been jailed for almost three years.

Daniel Kaye launched a series of attacks on Liberian cell phone operator Lonestar in October 2015, which became so powerful they knocked out the west African country’s internet the following year.
Kaye, 30, had been hired to carry out the attacks by a senior employee at rival operator Cellcom, Britain’s National Crime Agency said in a statement, although there is no suggestion that Cellcom was aware of the activity.
He pleaded guilty to creating and using a botnet, a series of computers connected in order to attack systems, and possessing criminal property last month. Kaye was sentenced on Friday at Blackfriars Crown Court in central London to two years and eight months in prison.
While living in Cyprus, Kaye used a botnet he had created to trigger repeated distributed denial of service (DDoS) requests on Lonestar, causing the company to spend around $600,000 in remedial action.
The additional impact of customers leaving the network caused the company to lose tens of millions of dollars in lost revenue, the NCA added.
Following his arrest in February 2017, Kaye was extradited to Germany, where he also admitted to attacks on Deutsche Telekom that affected around 1 million customers in November 2016.
“Daniel Kaye was operating as a highly skilled and capable hacker-for-hire,” Mike Hulett, Head of Operations at the NCA’s National Cyber Crime Unit, said.
“His activities inflicted substantial damage on numerous businesses in countries around the world, demonstrating the borderless nature of cyber crime,” he added. “The victims in this instance suffered losses of tens of millions of dollars and had to spend a large amount on mitigating action.”
Source: CNN

The internet is indeed an e-world of its own. As of 2012, a survey by Netcraft, a provider of cybercrime disruption services across a wide range of industries based in the UK showed that a total number of 144,000 websites launched daily, which amounts to over 51 million annually.

As of January 2018, (6 years later) the figure stood at 1,805,260,010 (over 1.8 billion) websites. Some of these websites grow big enough to rank among the world wide web’s top 500. Sadly, the rest of these websites get almost no visitors and rank lower not because they suck that bad, but just because the top can only fit too many at a time.

Below is a carefully researched, compiled and comprehensive list of 10 useful websites you wish you knew earlier.

1. The Internet Map
If not the coolest website on the internet right now, the internet map, designed by Ruslan Enikeev for a personal non-commercial project just as the name implies is indeed a map of the internet.

The internet map

The designer claims that this website continuously archives all other sites on the internet, representing them in dots. The sizes of the dots depict the ranking of the websites according to Alexa (Website ranking Algorithm by Amazon) making Google, Facebook among others a distinct turquoise sphere among the rest.

2. Radio Garden
Ever been curious enough to imagine how listening to radio stations from other countries sound? The user interface is quite intuitive, featuring a dynamic world map of live radio across the globe. It has navigation similar to google earth and unique features including Add favorite stations, history lookup, jingle mode, RDS, and mute mode guaranteed to make you want to bookmark this website immediately.

Radio Garden

Asides most social media websites, Radio Garden is ranked as one of the very few controversial sites where users get payable contents for free. The Radio Garden has a similar working concept as radiooooo.com asides the fact that radiooooo lets you choose your desired year and genre of radio.

3. Internet’s first website
The http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html created by Tim Berners-Lee is the home of the first website. Considering how there are over 1.8 billion websites in 2018, there was none 27 years ago. This first web page of the internet, published on August 6, 1991, was landmark informing the World of the world wide web project and ran on a NeXT computer at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN. It comprises steps on how to create Web pages and explained the meaning of a hypertext.

first website

In the absence of CSS, and simplified website builders including Dreamweaver, Elementor, Divi, and Envato, you should prepare your mind for something ‘amazing,’ especially before attempting to open this website.

4. Web Oasis
Most times, it gets boring staring at that static google.com home page right? How about making https://weboas.is/ your homepage instead?
Asides the cool hacking theme, Web Oasis has prebuilt bookmarks of most websites across the internet with clear navigation links which unveil on mouse hover plus a fully customizable user interface/elements, an add-on for everyday use including News, Tech, Radio, Crypto, quick notepad editor, Weather, Finance, a secure password generator, and even an arcade game.
Web Oasis

It also has an embedded chat room, a 2-character shortcut search engine mode, and a section on the screen’s top right corner showing your local system information. Now, this is the real Google, literally housing all of your wants on a single website.

5. Cymath
If Cymath was available decades earlier than 2013, then the internet would have been a better place, especially for students looking for a step-by-step approach towards the solution to their mathematics problems. Cymaths is every student’s dream plus you can have all your assignments done, be it graphs or equations.
Cymath
It’s inventors believe in the ideology of open education, and that every student deserves math help that is reliable and accessible, powered by a combination of artificial intelligence and heuristics, so that it solves math problems step-by-step like a teacher would.

6. Konboot 
The fact this that this website is available on the surface web is amusing. Konboot prides themselves as the world’s best remedy for forgotten passwords for a simple reason – it bypasses the authentication process of your (or probably not your) operating system without overwriting your old password or leaving a digital footprint.
KonbootTechnically, this website lets you log in to any Windows or Mac Operating system with full rights without prior knowledge of the machine’s password. Konboot is designed primarily for tech repairs, forensic teams, and security audit reasons. Piotr Bania is the mastermind behind this rare tool.

7. User testing
Finally, a freebie on the internet that isn’t a hoax? Except for the fact that this isn’t free money, you earn it. User Testing or usability testing pays between $10 – $30 for every website you test. The goal of user testing is the get a digital product in front of a customer as early as possible.
User testingUsers are asked to perform a specific task that simulates real-world usage of usually a website. These tasks can be as easy as opening multiple pages across a selected website while having a voice and screen capture, A/B tests, preference tests and eventually taking a UI/UX review questionnaire afterward. These tests take less than 10 minutes to complete, no experience is required, and the is no cap on the number of tests a user can take per day.

8. Awwwards
Unlike Amazon’s Alexa, which ranks websites with algorithms based off of web statistics, visits, relevance, and SEO optimization strategy, Awwwards typically accepts website submissions and allow users to rate these sites based on four distinct features: design, usability, creativity, and content.
AwwwardsAwwwards is the abode of a vast collection of mind-blowing websites across the internet where users not only get a chance to rate them based on design, creativity, and innovation on the internet but also gather unexplored ideas regarding their next projects. Users are also able to query and search directories based on their respective niche as well as hire and apply for website design positions site wide.

9. Rhyme Zone
Are you a Poet, song lyricist, into essay writing, a rapper, or just looking for rhythm? Then you should try out Rhyme Zone. RhymeZone is arguably the best and fastest way to find English words for any writing. It has been running continuously since 1996.
Rhyme ZoneIt is a concise guide for finding corresponding rhymes, antonyms, synonyms, descriptive words, definition, thesaurus, lyrics, poems, homophones, similar sounding words, related words, similar spellings, picture search, Shakespearean novel search, and letter matching.

10. Library Genesis
Library Genesis is a search engine for the biggest archive of free e-books on the internet allowing free access to content that is otherwise paywalled or not digitized anywhere else on the internet.
Irrespective of the type of books you read; novels, tech, educational material, LibGen (Sci-Tech), Scientific articles, Fiction, Comics Standards, and Magazines, you are rest assured such books reside here.
Library GenesisLibGen initially used the domain name libgen.org but was forced to shut down and to suspend use of the domain name due to copyright issues from authors In late October 2015. The LibGen website is blocked by a handful of ISPs in the UK for obvious reasons. As of 5 June 2018, Library Genesis claims its database contains over 2.7 million books and 58 million science magazine files.

Bottomline: Now that you’ve probably bookmarked these rare but real websites, spread the love by telling someone about this today.